logo

Make Your Career Soar

Forty-eight years ago this month, NASA astronauts Leroy Gordon Cooper and Charles M. “Pete” Conrad set a new spaceflight endurance record during the flight of Gemini 5.  It was the third of ten (10) missions in the historic Gemini spaceflight series.  The motto for the mission was “Eight Days or Bust”.

The purpose of Project Gemini was to develop and flight-prove a myriad of technologies required to get to the Moon.  Those technologies included spacecraft power systems, rendezvous and docking, orbital maneuvering, long duration spaceflight and extravehicular activity.

The Gemini spacecraft weighed 8,500 pounds at lift-off and measured 18.6 feet in length.  Gemini consisted of a reentry module (RM), an adapter module (AM) and an equipment module (EM).

The crew occupied the RM which also contained navigation, communication, telemetry, electrical and reentry reaction control systems.  The AM contained maneuver thrusters and the deboost rocket system.  The EM included the spacecraft orbit attitude control thrusters and the fuel cell system.  Both the AM and EM were used in orbit only and discarded prior to entry.

Gemini-Titan V (GT-5) lifted-off at 13:59:59 UTC from LC-19 at Cape Canaveral, Florida on Saturday, 21 August 1965.  The two-stage Titan II launch vehicle placed Gemini 5 into a 189 nautical mile x 87 nautical mile elliptical orbit.

A primary purpose of the Gemini 5 mission was to remain in orbit at least eight (8) days.  This was the minimum time it would take to fly to the Moon, land and return to the Earth.  Other goals of the Gemini 5 mission were to test the first fuel cells, deploy and rendezvous with a special rendezvous pod and conduct a variety of medical experiments.

Despite fuel cell problems, electrical system anomalies, reaction control system issues and the cancellation of various experiments, Gemini 5 was able to meet the goal of an 8-day flight.  But it wasn’t easy.  The last days of the mission were especially demanding since the crew didn’t have much to do.  Pete Conrad called his Gemini 5 experience “8 days in a garbage can.”

On Sunday, 29 August 1965, Gemini 5 splashed-down in the Atlantic Ocean at 12:55:13 UTC.  Mission elapsed time was 7 days, 22 hours, 55 minutes and 13 seconds.  A new spaceflight endurance record.

Gemini 5 was Gordon Cooper’s last spaceflight.  Cooper left NASA due to a deteriorating relationship with management.  Pete Conrad flew three (3) more times in space.  In particular, he commanded the Gemini 11, Apollo 12 and Skylab I missions.  Indeed, Conrad’s Apollo 12 experience made him the third man to walk on the Moon.

Posted in Aerospace, History

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *