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First-Powered-Flight

One-hundred and ten years ago today, the Wright Flyer became the first aircraft in history to achieve powered flight.  The site of this historic event was Kill Devil Hills near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.

Americans Wilbur and Orville Wright began their legendary aeronautical careers in 1899.  In just four short years, the brothers would go from complete aeronautical novices to inventors and pilots of the world’s first successful powered aircraft.  Interestingly, neither man attended college nor received even a high school diploma.

The Wright Flyer measured roughly 21 feet in length and had a wing span of approximately 40 feet.  The biplane aircraft had an empty weight of 605 lbs.  Power was provided by a single 12 horsepower, 4-cylinder engine that drove twin 8.5 foot , two-blade propellers.

The Flyer made a powered take-off run along a 60-foot wooden guide rail.  The aircraft was mounted on a two-wheel dolly that rode along the track and was jettisoned at lift-off.   The Flyer pilot lay prone in the middle of the lower wing.  Twin elevator and rudder surfaces provided aircraft pitch and yaw control, respectively.  Roll control was via differential wing warping.

The Wright Brothers had come  close to achieving a successful powered flight with the Wright Flyer on Monday, 14 December 1903.  Wilbur, by virtue of winning the coin toss, was the pilot for this initial attempt.  However, the Flyer stalled and hit the ground sharply just after take-off.  Wilbur was unhurt, but repair of the damaged aircraft would require two days to complete.

The next attempt flight took place on Thursday, 17 December 1903.  The weather was terrible.  Windy and rainy.  Even after the rain abated, the wind continued to blow in excess of 20 mph.  The Wrights decided to fly anyway.  It was now Orville’s turn as command pilot.

Orville took his position on the Flyer and was quickly launched into the wind.  Once airborne, the aircraft proved difficult to control as it porpoised up and down along the flight path.  Nonetheless, Orville kept the Flyer in the air for 12 seconds before landing 120 feet from the take-off point.  Other than a damaged skid, the aircraft was intact and the pilot unhurt.  Powered flight was a reality!

Three more flights followed on that momentous occasion as the brothers alternated piloting assignments.  The fourth flight was the longest in both time aloft and distance flown.  With Wilbur at the controls, the Wright Flyer flew for 59 seconds and landed 852 feet from the take-off point.

The Wright Brothers father, Milton, would soon learn of the epic events that December day in North Carolina.  Orville’s verbatim Western Union telegram message sent to Dayton, Ohio read:

Success   four flights  thursday morning   all against twenty one mile wind started from Level with engine power alone   average speed through air thirty one miles    longest 57 [sic] seconds    inform Press    home Christmas.

Posted in Aerospace, History

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